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Introduction

  • Betty W. Steiner
  • Ray Blanchard
  • Kenneth J. Zucker
Part of the Perspectives in Sexuality book series (PISE)

Abstract

Throughout the ages, there have been men who wished to be women and women who wished to be men. There are many fascinating examples of such persons in history and in literature if one is sufficiently interested to search for them (Bullough, 1975, 1976; Green, 1974; Karlen, 1971; Steiner, 1981; Weinrich, 1976). Individuals with cross-gender wishes and cross-gender behavior have existed in every major culture in the world, knowing no boundaries of race, creed, or color. Thus, historical study reveals that transsexualism and related disorders of gender identity are not conditions peculiar to modern times.

Keywords

Gender Identity Gender Dysphoria Diagnostic Label Gender Identity Disorder Bull Johns Hopkins Hosp 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Betty W. Steiner
    • 1
  • Ray Blanchard
    • 1
  • Kenneth J. Zucker
    • 2
  1. 1.Clarke Institute of PsychiatryGender Identity ClinicTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Clarke Institute of PsychiatryChild and Family Studies CentreTorontoCanada

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