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Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

  • Gerhard R. F. Krueger

Abstract

Besides Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) represents a unique model for studying the relationships between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, immune response, and neoplastic transformation. The association of EBV infection and NPC is even closer than in BL: all nonkeratinizing NPC exhibit significantly elevated anti-EBV antibody titers while extra-African BL only sporadically are seropositive.

Keywords

Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Infectious Mononucleosis Lymphoid Cell Line Viral Capsid Antigen Lymphoid Stroma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerhard R. F. Krueger
    • 1
  1. 1.Immunopathology Section, Pathology InstituteUniversity of CologneCologne 41Federal Republic of Germany

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