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Lymphoma in Cardiac Transplant Recipients Associated with Cyclosporin A, Prednisone and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin (ATG)

  • Charles P. Bieber
  • Richard L. Heberling
  • S. W. Jamieson
  • Phillip E. Oyer
  • Michael Cleary
  • Roger Warnke
  • Ari Saemundsen
  • George Klein
  • Werner Henle
  • E. B. Stinson

Abstract

Cardiac transplantation has been used since 1968 to restore cardiac function in selected patients with otherwise unmanageable heart disease. In these recipients successful outcome of the procedure has been highly dependent upon effective management of allograft rejection using immunosuppressive agents. Prior to 1980 these agents included Azathioprine, corticosteroids and antithymocyte globulin — ATG (conventional therapy). In 1980 cyclosporin A, a fungal product whose therapeutic effect appears to result from its ability to block allograft directed T cell cytotoxic responses while leaving intact T cell suppressoV responses, was substituted for azathioprine in the conventional therapy regimen (cyclosporin A therapy) (1,2). Although outcome of transplantation has been favorably effected in patients treated with cyclosporin A (79% one year survival vs. 63% in conventionally treated recipients) morbidity due to lymphoma has increased.

Keywords

Antithymocyte Globulin Viral Capsid Antigen Cardiac Transplant Recipient Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma Splenic Artery Aneurysm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles P. Bieber
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Richard L. Heberling
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • S. W. Jamieson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Phillip E. Oyer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Michael Cleary
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Roger Warnke
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Ari Saemundsen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • George Klein
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Werner Henle
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • E. B. Stinson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Departments of Cardiovascular Surgery and PathologyStanford University Medical CenterStanfordUSA
  2. 2.The Southwest Foundation for ResearchSan AntonioUSA
  3. 3.The Institute for Tumor BiologyKarolinska InstituteStockholm 60Sweden
  4. 4.Joseph Stokes, Jr. Research InstituteChildren’s HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA

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