Advertisement

Emergency Care of Rape Victims

  • Maria C. Sauzier
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

Rape is an act of violence. The rapist uses sex to humiliate, degrade, and inflict pain and injury on a person weaker than himself. The power differential either is inherent (for example, between an adult and a child) or is attained by using threats, physical force, or a weapon. For the victim, it represents an unexpected, brutal invasion of her privacy as well as a life-threatening situation. Rape inevitably produces a psychosocial crisis, with resultant disruption of intrapsychic equilibrium and loss of usual coping mechanisms. Interpersonal relationships are deeply affected; feelings of fear, anxiety, shame, self-recrimination, and guilt are prominent. The emotional crisis may be compounded by actual physical injuries. Skillful emergency management should focus on alleviating the victim’s immediate distress, providing medical treatment, psychological support and legal information, and arranging follow-up care.

Keywords

Pelvic Examination Pubic Hair Rape Victim Actual Rape Forcible Rape 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Federal Bureau of Investigation: Uniform Crime Reports: Crime in the US, 1979. Washington, US Government Printing Office, 1980.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Massachusetts General Law Annotated, 1980, Chapter 265.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Richmond AE: Rape law and the judicial process, in Mccombie S (ed): The Rape Crisis Intervention Handbook. New York, Plenum Press, 1980, pp 79–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Massachusetts General Law Annotated, 1980, Chapter 459.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Mccombie S (ed): The Rape Crisis Intervention Handbook. New York, Plenum Press, 1980.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Brownmiller S: Against Our Will: Men, Women and Rape. New York, Bantam Books, 1976.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Burgess AW, Holmstram LL (eds): Rape: Victims of Crisis. Bowie, Md, Robert J. Brodie, 1974.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Nadelson C, Notman M: Psychoanalytic considerations of the response to rape. Int Rev Psychoanal6: 97–103, 1979.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Groth AN, Birnbaum HJ: The rapist: Motivations for sexual violence, in Mccombie S (ed): The Rape Crisis Intervention Handbook. New York, Plenum Press, 1980, pp 17–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Amir M: Patterns of Forcible Rape. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1971.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Groth N: Men Who Rape: The Psychology of the Offender. New York, Plenum Press, 1979.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Groth N, Burgess AW: Rape: A sexual deviation. Am J Orthopsychiatry47: 400–406, 1977.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Groth N, Burgess AW, Holmstrom LL: Rape: Power, anger and sexuality. Am J Psychiatry134: 1239–1243, 1977.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Groth AN, Burgess AW: Rape: A sexual deviation. Am J Orthopsychiatr47 (3): 400–406, 1977.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Sutherland S, Scherl DJ: Patterns of response among victims of rape. Am J Ortho spychiatry40: 503–511, 1970.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Burgess AW, Holmstrom LL: Rape trauma syndrome. Am J Psychiatry131: 981–985, 1974.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Parad HJ (ed): Crisis Intervention. New York, Family Service Association, 1965.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Lindemann E: Symptoms of acute grief. Am J Psychiatry101: 141–148, 1944.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Caplan G: Principles of Preventive Psychiatry, New York, Basic Books, 1964.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Bassuk E: A crisis theory perspective on rape, in Mccombie S (ed): The Rape Crisis Intervention Handbook. New York, Plenum Press, 1980, pp 121–131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Katan A: Children who were raped. Psychoanal Study Child28: 208–224, 1973.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Nadelson CC, Notman MT: Psychological responses to rape. Psychiatr Opinion14: 13–18, 1977.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Notman MT, Nadelson CC: The rape victim: Psychodynamic considerations. Am J Psychiatry133: 408–413, 1976.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Mccombie SL: Characteristics of rape victims seen in crisis intervention. Smith Coll Stud Soc Work46: 137–158, 1976.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Burgess AW, Holmstrom LL: Coping behavior of the rape victim. Am J Psychiatry133: 413–417, 1976.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Burgess AW, Holmstrom LL: The rape victim in the emergency ward. Am J Nursing73: 1740–1745, 1973.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Gilmore BS, Evans JW: The nursing care of rape victims, in Mccombie S (ed): The Rape Crisis Intervention Handbook. New York, Plenum Press, 1980, pp 43–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Silverman D: First do no more harm: Female rape victims and the male counselor. Am J Orthopsychiatry47: 91–96, 1977.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Hallek SL: The physicians role in the management of victims of sex offenders. JAMA180: 273–278, 1962.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Appendices, in Mccombie S: The Rape Crisis Intervention Handbook. New York, Plenum Press, 1980.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Mccombie SL, Bassuk E, Savitz R, Pell S: Development of a medical center rape crisis intervention program. Am J Psychiatry133: 418–421, 1972.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Klapholz H: The medical examination: Treatment and evidence collection, in Mccombie S (ed.): The Rape Crisis Intervention Handbook. New York, Plenum Press, 1980, pp 59–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Wertheimer A: Examination of the rape victim. Postgrad Med71: 173–180, 1982.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Braen GR: The Rape Examination. North Chicago, 111, Abbott Laboratories.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Hilberman E: The impact of rape in the woman patient, in Notman M, Nadelson C (eds): New York, Plenum Press, 1978.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria C. Sauzier
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Tufts University Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

Personalised recommendations