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The Response of Tumor-Bearing Patients to the Injection of Lymphoid Cell Line Lymphokine

  • D. C. Dumonde
  • Melanie S. Pulley
  • Anne S. Hamblin
  • Barbara M. Southcott
  • F. C. Den Hollander
Part of the GWUMC Department of Biochemistry Annual Spring Symposia book series (GWUN)

Abstract

We began this work in 1976 at a time when lymphokines were becoming accepted as mediators of cellular immune responses and when consideration was being given to the immunodepression associated with progressive cancer and with its treatment. At that time, work on leukocyte interferon, dialyzable leukocyte transfer factor, and thymic extracts had established a precedent for the therapeutic investigation of biological materials in patients with otherwise irreversible neoplastic disease; and it seemed that lymphokines could also have therapeutic potential in human cancer (Hamblin et al., 1978). We were examining lymphokines generated by the cultured B-lymphoblastoid cell line RPMI 1788 as potential standards in the leukocyte migration test (see Hamblin et al., 1982); and when Papermaster et al. (1976) reported on the safe intralesional (i.l.) injection of RPMI 1788 lymphokine into human cutaneous metastases, we decided to use this source of lymphokine for the present study. With ethical permission and informed consent, we set out to extend knowledge of the histopathological responses to the i.d. and i.l. injection of RPMI 1788 lymphokine (“LCL-LK”) in patients with advanced cancer and to investigate the clinical, hematological, biochemical, and immunological responses to single and repeated i.v. injections of LCL-LK.

Keywords

Thymic Extract Tumor Cell Necrosis Cell Line RPMI Intraprostatic Injection Leukocyte Migration Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. C. Dumonde
    • 1
  • Melanie S. Pulley
    • 1
  • Anne S. Hamblin
    • 1
  • Barbara M. Southcott
    • 2
  • F. C. Den Hollander
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologySt. Thomas’ HospitalLondonEngland
  2. 2.Department of RadiotherapyCharing Cross HospitalLondon W6England
  3. 3.Organon International BVOssThe Netherlands

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