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Phase I Trial of Intravenous Lymphokine MAF

  • Ben W. Papermaster
  • Ralph D. Reynolds
  • John E. McEntire
  • Pamela A. Dunn
  • Jeanne Walter
  • Mary K. Doyle
  • William Eaton
Part of the GWUMC Department of Biochemistry Annual Spring Symposia book series (GWUN)

Abstract

Preparation of large enough quantities of purified, chemically characterized biological response modifiers (BRMs) has required years of preparative and analytic studies leading to isolation and characterization of biologically active, pure peptides. Prior to the presently limited use of such peptides, phase I studies were carried out to determine biological effects of more complex preparations in patients, as in the case of human leukocyte interferon (Strander et al., 1973) and thymosin fraction 5 (Costanzi et al., 1977). Complex lymphokine fractions have been used for inducing local skin inflammatory reactions (Papermaster et al., 1976) and to treat dermal tumor lesions by direct intralesional injection (Paradinas et al., 1982) and also have been administered intravenously by Dumonde et al. (1981) to patients with disseminated cancer at low to moderate doses [1–2 ml delivering a total of 70 mg protein (Organon preparation)] and roughly equivalent to our unitage of between 200 and 500 units (Paradinas et al., 1982).

Keywords

Migration Inhibitory Factor Serum Iron Serum Protein Electrophoresis Underlying Heart Disease Inferior Myocardial Infarction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ben W. Papermaster
    • 1
  • Ralph D. Reynolds
    • 1
  • John E. McEntire
    • 1
  • Pamela A. Dunn
    • 1
  • Jeanne Walter
    • 1
  • Mary K. Doyle
    • 1
  • William Eaton
    • 1
  1. 1.Cancer Research Center and Ellis Fischel State Cancer CenterColumbiaUSA

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