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Pituitary Responses to Acute Administration of Thymosin and to Thymectomy in Prepubertal Primates

  • David L. Healy
  • Nicholas R. Hall
  • Heinrich M. Schulte
  • George P. Chrousos
  • Allan L. Goldstein
  • D. Lynn Loriaux
  • Gary D. Hodgen
Part of the GWUMC Department of Biochemistry Annual Spring Symposia book series (GWUN)

Abstract

There is firm clinical and laboratory evidence that adrenal glucocorticoids induce thymic involution, reduce mitotic activity in thymus-dependent (T) lymphocytes, and inhibit phagocytic activity of human leukocytes (Ishidate and Metcalf, 1963; Monjan, 1981). By contrast, low concentrations of glucocorticoids enhance thymocyte differentiation and stimulate antibody formation in vitro (Ambrose, 1964; Ritter, 1977). How this interaction between the hypophyseal-adrenal axis and the immune system is controlled is unclear.

Keywords

Luteinizing Hormone Plasma Cortisol Cortisol Concentration Pituitary Hormone Plasma ACTH 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Healy
    • 1
  • Nicholas R. Hall
    • 3
  • Heinrich M. Schulte
    • 2
  • George P. Chrousos
    • 2
  • Allan L. Goldstein
    • 3
  • D. Lynn Loriaux
    • 2
  • Gary D. Hodgen
    • 1
  1. 1.Pregnancy Research Branch, NICHDNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Developmental Endocrinology Branch, NICHDNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiochemistryThe George Washington University School of Medicine and Health SciencesUSA

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