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Dual Diagnosis of Mental Retardation and Mental Illness

An Overview
  • Stephen Ruedrich
  • Frank J. Menolascino

Abstract

The recent national movement removing the mentally retarded from institutional settings into the community has literally changed the definitions of normal and abnormal behavior in these individuals. Specifically, the impact of deinstitutionalization not only has changed the physical site of service delivery but has also dramatically altered the need for mental health services for the mentally retarded. Behaviors that were traditionally viewed as “expected” in institutionalized retarded citizens are often viewed as abnormal within the mainstream of society.1 For example, the clinical phenomena of rocking, rumination, and head banging are frequent in the institutionalized retarded; within the institutional setting, they are traditionally viewed as “expected” behaviors, and their abnormalities are tolerated. Such behaviors are rarely seen in retarded citizens raised at home. That certain behaviors occur more frequently in certain settings can be explained either by a difference in the individuals in the two settings or by an environment that promotes, allows, or expects such behavior.

Keywords

Mental Illness Psychiatric Disorder Mental Retardation Mental Health Professional Emotional Disturbance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Ruedrich
    • 1
  • Frank J. Menolascino
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Nebraska Psychiatric InstituteUniversity of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Nebraska Psychiatric InstituteUniversity of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA

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