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Teaching Behavior Modification Skills to Paraprofessionals

  • Luke S. WatsonJr.

Abstract

The success of behavior modification programs depends, to a great extent, on the type of in-service training staff receive.1-5 Programs designed to teach mentally retarded persons independent living skills and to manage their disruptive behavior often fail because staff have not received the necessary training.6 Paraprofessional staff, in particular, need the appropriate training because they constitute the major work force in residential facilities, including group homes, special-educational, and/or day-care programs.

Keywords

Disruptive Behavior Academic Training Parent Training Program Reading Assignment Behavior Modification Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luke S. WatsonJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Therapeutic Homes, Inc.Fort MyersUSA

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