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Idiotypes of Ir Gene-Controlled Anti-GAT Response

  • Shyr-Te Ju

Abstract

In mice, the immune response to the synthetic polypeptide GAT, a random linear polymer, poly(L-Glu60,L-Ala30,L-Tyr10), is under the control of immune response (Ir) genes localized in the Iregion of the major histocompatibility complex.(1) Mice bearingH-2 p,q,s haplotypes are nonresponders. This nonresponsiveness can be bypassed by immunization with GAT complexed with methylated bovine serum albumin (GAT-MBSA).(2)Prior injection of GAT into nonresponder strains induces a population of suppressor T cells that specifically suppress the anti-GAT response to a subsequent immunization with GAT-MBSA.(3) Furthermore, factors generated from GAT-specific suppressor T cells can specifically suppress the GAT-specific plaque-forming cell response to GAT-MBSA.(4)Subsequent studies demonstrated that these antigen-binding T-cell factors lack immunoglobulin constant region determinants and possess MHC-coded determinants.(5) Because immunoglobulins presently comprise the only known system which exhibits antigen specificity and diversity among its members, it is possible that T-cell factors possess a structure equivalent to an immunoglobulin variable (V) region, associated with an MHC product, thus conferring T-cell receptors with antigen-specificity, diversity, and functional activity. This hypothesis, which has important implications for the nature of T-cell receptors if proven correct, prompted us to carry out systematic and extensive analyses on the idiotypes on anti-GAT antibodies. This effort has resulted in the identification of several related, and distinct anti-GAT idiotypic families. More importantly, we have used well-characterized anti-idiotypic reagents to study the serological relationship between antigen-specific T-cell receptors and antibodies.(6–8) The purpose of this chapter is to review the immunochemical properties of murine anti-GAT idiotypic families. Each family will be discussed separately and focus will be centered on the methods of identification as well as the common and the unique properties of each idiotypic family.

Keywords

Antigenic Determinant Random Polymer Diversification Process Immunochemical Property Idiotypic Antibody 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shyr-Te Ju
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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