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Arboviruses

  • Wilbur G. Downs

Abstract

Well over 400 arboviruses are distinguishable by serological procedures. Theiler and Downs(74) list 273 as of 1973. The American Committee on Arthropod-Borne Viruses published the Catalogue of Arthropod-Borne Viruses of the World (ACAV), compiled by R. M. Taylor, in 1967,(2) and this was supplemented by additional listings in 1970(3) and 1971.(4) A complete updated revision of the catalogue appeared in 1975(2) and an additional listing in 1978.(4a) These publications contain basic information on geographic distribution, hosts and vectors, pathogenesis and pathology, cultural characteristics, and composition and morphology, plus a bibliography for each virus.

Keywords

West Nile Virus Yellow Fever Hemagglutination Inhibition Complement Fixation African Swine Fever Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Reading

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wilbur G. Downs
    • 1
  1. 1.Yale Arbovirus Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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