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Preclinical Examination of Ocular Photoradiation Therapy

  • Charles J. Gomer
  • A. Linn Murphree
  • Daniel R. Doiron
  • Bernard C. Szirth
  • Nicholas J. Razum

Abstract

Hematoporphyrin derivative photoradiation therapy is an effective therapeutic modality for several types of solid tumors 1,2. One area of recent clinical interest is the exploitation of HpD PRT for the treatment of ocular malignancies 3,4. New therapies which can provide effective tumor destruction and minimal normal ocular tissue damage are needed since the current modalities used for treating eye tumors (external beam radiation, radioisotope plaques, photocoagulation and cryotherapy) are not totally satisfactory 5,6. HpD PRT may provide a modality which can be utilized for the treatment of both retinoblastoma and uveal melanoma. In addition, this procedure may be useful as both a primary modality in selective instances as well as a secondary modality following recurrence.

Keywords

Fluorescein Angiography Uveal Melanoma Fundus Photography Ocular Toxicity Retinal Edema 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles J. Gomer
    • 1
  • A. Linn Murphree
    • 1
  • Daniel R. Doiron
    • 1
  • Bernard C. Szirth
    • 1
  • Nicholas J. Razum
    • 1
  1. 1.Clayton Center for Ocular Oncology, Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles and Departments of Pediatrics (Division of Hematology-Oncology) and OphthalmologyUSC School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA

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