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Excited State Properties of Haematoporphyrin

  • R. Brookfield
  • M. Craw
  • C. R. Lambert
  • E. J. Land
  • R. Redmond
  • R. S. Sinclair
  • T. G. Truscott

Abstract

The active component of ‘haematoporphyrin derivative’ (HpD) is probably some aggregate involving both haematoporphyrin (Hp) and hydroxyethylvinyldeuteroporphyrin (HVD) at least as far as selective accumulation in tumours is concerned. Subsequent monomerisation in the cell could occur with the aggregate acting as a ‘pool’ of Hp and HVD so that it is of interest to examine the photophysical properties of such molecules in environments where they may be expected to be monomers as well as in environments where aggregation occurs. In this paper we describe the photophysical properties of Hp in acetone, various detergents, methanol-water mixtures, phosphate buffers and aqueous alkali as well as preliminary results using phosphatidyl choline (PC) vesicles and white blood cells. The major part of the work concerns the study of the lowest excited triplet state of Hp by laser flash photolysis (347 nm excitation).

Keywords

Phosphatidyl Choline Pulse Radiolysis Aqueous Alkali Laser Flash Photolysis Excite State Property 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Brookfield
    • 1
  • M. Craw
    • 2
  • C. R. Lambert
    • 2
  • E. J. Land
    • 3
  • R. Redmond
    • 2
  • R. S. Sinclair
    • 2
  • T. G. Truscott
    • 2
  1. 1.Davy Faraday LaboratoryThe Royal InstitutionLondonUK
  2. 2.Chemistry Dept.Paisley CollegePaisleyScotland
  3. 3.Paterson LaboratoriesThe Christie Hospital and Holt Radium InstituteManchesterUK

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