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Application of Genetic Engineering to Industrial Waste/Wastewater Treatment

  • Hester A. Kobayashi
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 28)

Abstract

Despite the many recent advances in various aspects of genetic engineering, application of the technology to waste/wastewater treatment is still in its infancy. The genetics of microorganisms important in biological treatment is almost unknown except for that of the most common organisms, and the state of the art is to a large extent still in the laboratory (1–12). In addition, the ways in which genetic engineering can be most effectively applied to waste/ wastewater are as yet poorly defined.

Keywords

Chemical Oxygen Demand Genetic Engineering Biological Treatment Extreme Environment American Petroleum Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hester A. Kobayashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Standard Oil of Ohio Research CenterClevelandUSA

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