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Biologic and Chemotherapeutic Forays into the Field of Unconventional Viruses

  • Paul Brown
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 73)

Abstract

The subject of this presentation is a group of agents which, because of their unusual biological behavior and common pathology, have been termed “unconventional viruses”. They are responsible for two diseases of man and two diseases of animals that are characterized by incubation periods of up to 10 or more years, followed by subacute to chronic, invariably fatal neurologic illnesses, with a distinctive brain histopathology of diffuse spongiosis, astrocytosis, and neuronal loss, in the absence of any inflammatory changes.

Keywords

Spider Monkey Scrapie Agent Visceral Tissue Scrapie Infectivity Natural Scrapie 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Brown
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Central Nervous System StudiesNational Institute of Neurologic and Communicative Disorders and StrokeUSA
  2. 2.National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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