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Formation of Calcium-Parvalbumin Complex during Contraction. A Source of “Unexplained Heat”?

  • J. M. Gillis
  • J. Lefevre
  • D. Thomason
  • R. H. Kretsinger
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 37)

Abstract

Computer simulation of the kinetics of the distribution of Ca between troponin, parvalbumin and the sarcoplasmic reticulum, during contraction and relaxation shows that parvalbumins can contribute significantly to the rate of relaxation and to the post contractile translocation of calcium. The binding of Ca to parvalbumin is an exothermic process which may account for about 20% of the ‘unexplained heat’ during contraction.

Keywords

Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Fast Skeletal Muscle Tail Beat Frequency Free Magnesium Skinned Fiber Preparation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Gillis
    • 1
  • J. Lefevre
    • 1
  • D. Thomason
    • 2
  • R. H. Kretsinger
    • 2
  1. 1.Departement de PhysiologieUniversite Catholique de LouvainBruxellesBelgium
  2. 2.Department of BiologyUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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