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Social Risk Factors for Psychiatric Disorders: Being Young, Poor and Lonely

  • Myrna M. Weissman
  • Jerome K. Myers
  • Gary L. Tischler
  • Philip J. Leaf
  • Charles E. HolzerIII

Abstract

Study of the relationship between social factors, such as social class or social stress, and mental illness through epidemiologic surveys has a long tradition at Yale University. The tradition began in the 1950s with Hollingshead and Redlich’s classic study on social class and mental illness which showed that social class determined treatment for mental illness.1 The tradition was carried on by Myers and Bean,2 students of Hollingshead who began a longitudinal community survey in the 1960s and demonstrated the relationship between social stress and mental impairment independent of specific psychiatric diagnosis.3

Keywords

Mental Illness Social Class Social Stress Epidemiologic Catchment Area Social Risk Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Myrna M. Weissman
    • 1
  • Jerome K. Myers
    • 1
  • Gary L. Tischler
    • 1
  • Philip J. Leaf
    • 1
  • Charles E. HolzerIII
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry, Epidemiology & SociologyYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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