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Social Support in the Etiology of Depression: A Panel Study

  • Nan Lin
  • Alfred Dean

Abstract

The substantial contemporary interest in the epidemiologic functions of social support or social support networks in depression and other disorders is rooted in a number of sources. These include (1) the growing scientific and clinical conviction that stress may be a significant factor in a wide variety of psychiatric and physical disorders. (2) In the epidemiologic literature in particular, the weight of evidence that recent life changes have a significant, if modest, effect on the occurrence of depression leads to a sustained search for clarification of factors which may explain the differential vulnerability of individuals to illness in the context of recent life changes or other stressors. These factors include biological, psychological or social support. (3) The existence of highly suggestive evidence that social support may serve to reduce the risk of illness in the face of stress (the buffering effect of social support). And, (4) the theoretical importance of intimate relationships within the fields of sociology, clinical psychology and psychiatry.

Keywords

Social Support Social Support Network Epidemiologic Literature Physical Disorder Differential Vulnerability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Dean, A., and Lin, N., 1977, The stress-buffering role of social support, JNMD, 165: 403–417.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Lin, N., 1982, Social resources and instrumental action, in “Social Structure and Network Analysis,” P. Marsden and N. Lin, eds., Sage, CA.Google Scholar
  3. Lin, N., 1983, Social resources and social actions: a progress repor, Connections, Vol. VI.Google Scholar
  4. Lin, N., Woelfel, M., and Light, S., 1983, The buffering effect of social support subsequent to an important life event.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nan Lin
    • 1
  • Alfred Dean
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Department of PsychiatryState University of New York at Albany and Albany Medical CollegeAlbanyUSA

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