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The Somatization Process and Its Relation to Psychosomatic Pathology

  • Don R. Lipsitt

Abstract

At the very outset, in order to frame our discussion in contemporary thought, it is important to reiterate that the scope, content and definition of psychosomatic medicine has changed dramatically since its productive beginnings as a research field in the late 1930’s. Many of the early hypotheses and theories of linear causality--whether arising out of emotional conflict or personality types--have been supplanted by broader multifactorial accounts of symptom formation and disease process as they are influenced by an almost endless array of physiologic, psychologic and social or environmental variables.

Keywords

Psychosomatic Medicine External Reality Emotional Conflict Symptom Formation Somatic Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don R. Lipsitt
    • 1
  1. 1.Mount Auburn HospitalCambridgeUSA

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