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A Research Approach to Social Skills Training

  • Robert C. Smolen
  • Marianne K. Bakker-Rabdau
  • David A. Spiegel
  • Cornelis B. Bakker

Abstract

An important element of the Adult Development Program (1) is the training of social-skill behaviors. These behaviors, conceptualized in terms of human territorality (2), are aimed chiefly at either territorial acquisition or defense. According to the territorality model, individuals are alerted to undesired trespass by feelings of anger or irritation. If such feeling states are ignored and the individual fails to assert, i.e., to take effective defensive action, then several highly undesirable consequences will occur: Feelings of anger will continue, feelings of resentment and depression will emerge, and behavioral and emotional withdrawal from the trespassor will be likely. If this formulation is valid, then nonassertive persons not only lose territory but experience unpleasant affective states and place their relationships in jeopardy.

Keywords

Marital Adjustment Feeling State Dyadic Adjustment Dyadic Adjustment Scale Successful Defense 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert C. Smolen
    • 1
  • Marianne K. Bakker-Rabdau
    • 1
  • David A. Spiegel
    • 1
  • Cornelis B. Bakker
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Illinois College of Medicine at PeoriaPeoriaUSA

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