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School Phobia

  • Thomas H. Ollendick
  • Joni A. Mayer

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to examine the current status of school phobia from a learning-based perspective. In pursuing this goal, issues related to diag nosis, incidence, etiology, assessment, treatment, and prevention will be addressed. Quite obviously, a chapter such as this cannot claim to provide an index to all of the literature or issues in this area. Rather, our objective has been to present an overview of major considerations, trends, and points of view that lead to an awareness of the complexity of school phobia and that suggest new and meaningful research directions.

Keywords

Behavioral Observation School Attendance Separation Anxiety Behavioral Assessment School Refusal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas H. Ollendick
    • 1
  • Joni A. Mayer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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