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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorders

  • Samuel M. Turner
  • Larry Michelson

Abstract

Although obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is the least prevalent of the anxiety disorders, it is often one of the more severe, extracting a heavy toll in personal and social debilitation. As a diagnostic entity it is easily recognizable, and Esquirol, as early as 1838, described the disorder. More systematic defi nitions were offered by Janet (1908), Schneider (1925), and Lewis (1966). In this chapter, we will review and summarize the clinical syndrome, theories, relationships to other conditions, and contemporary treatments. An exhaustive review, however, is beyond the scope of this chapter, and the reader may refer to Rachman and Hodgson (1980), Beech (1974), and Mavissakalian, Turner, and Michelson (in preparation) for comprehensive critiques.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Response Prevention Phobic Disorder Ritualistic Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel M. Turner
    • 1
  • Larry Michelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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