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Agoraphobia

  • Gerald T. O’Brien
  • David H. Barlow

Abstract

Agoraphobia is the most complex and disabling of the phobias. Agras, Sylves ter, and Oliveau (1969) have estimated that the prevalence rate of agoraphobia is 6 per 1,000 people. Although agoraphobia is not the most common phobia, it is the one seen most frequently by mental health professionals, mainly because comparatively few individuals with less disabling phobias ever seek professional help (Agras, Sylvester, & Oliveau, 1969). In fact, due to increased attention to agoraphobia in both scientific and lay publications in recent years, it seems that agoraphobics are at present more likely than ever to seek and receive professional help for their handicaps.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Avoidance Behavior Panic Attack Behavioral Assessment Exposure Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald T. O’Brien
    • 1
  • David H. Barlow
    • 2
  1. 1.Agoraphobia and Anxiety Program, Department of PsychiatryTemple University Medical SchoolPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders, Department of PsychologyState University of New York at AlbanyAlbanyUSA

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