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Simple Phobia

  • Ellie T. Sturgis
  • Reda Scott

Abstract

The inclusion of a chapter on simple phobias in a book discussing the behav ioral treatment of anxiety is quite appropriate, since this disorder was one of the first explained and treated from a behavioristic standpoint. The early experimental psychologists, including Watson and Raynor (1920) and Mowrer (1939) explained the development of specific fears using a conditioning model. In one of the first behavioral treatment programs, Jones extended this earlier work and demonstrated the extinction of a small-animal fear using principles of counterconditioning. The roots of behavior therapy in England and South Africa were also involved with the investigation of irrational fears and anxiety (O’Leary & Wilson, 1975). Even during the early days of behavior therapy, when the orientation was not well accepted by the majority of psychologists and psychiatrists, the simple phobia was one of the few conditions referred to the behaviorist for treatment.

Keywords

Tonic Immobility Phobic Disorder Participant Modeling Systematic Desensitization Conditioning Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ellie T. Sturgis
    • 1
  • Reda Scott
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA
  2. 2.Psychology Service, Jackson Veterans Administration Medical Center, and Department of Psychiatry and Human BehaviorUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA

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