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Behavioral Theories of Anxiety Disorders

  • Dennis J. Delprato
  • F. Dudley McGlynn

Abstract

In 1917, Watson and Morgan theorized that Pavlov’s (1927) conditioning paradigm could account for much emotional behavior in humans. In subsequent studies Watson and Rayner (1920) and Jones (1924) supported the classical conditioning interpretation of human fear behavior. These efforts provided the first conceptual foundation for that part of behavior therapy concerned with anxiety and the neuroses (e.g., Wolpe, 1958). Hence the Pavlovian model of conditioned emotionality became part of the early behavioral orthodoxy.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Physiological Psychology Warning Signal Avoidance Behavior Classical Conditioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis J. Delprato
    • 1
  • F. Dudley McGlynn
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyEastern Michigan UniversityYpsilantiUSA
  2. 2.Department of Basic Dental SciencesUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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