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Detectors

  • Francis I. Onuska
  • Francis W. Karasek

Abstract

Gas chromatographic detectors for environmental analysis must be sensitive to the minute amounts of contaminants being analyzed, but selective enough to discriminate against reasonable amounts of coexisting substrate materials. Despite this selectivity, it is necessary to protect the total gas chromatographic system by purifying extracts of the sample. This step will reduce the amount of impurities in the final solution to a level that will not be detrimental to the WCOT column or to the quality of the separation and measurement.

Keywords

Flame Ionization Detector Chemical Ionization Field Ionization Hydrogen Flow Rate Alkali Metal Salt 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francis I. Onuska
    • 1
  • Francis W. Karasek
    • 2
  1. 1.Canada Centre for Inland WaterNational Water Research InstituteBurlingtonCanada
  2. 2.University of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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