Functional Murine T-Cell Clones

  • Frank W. Fitch
  • Andrew L. Glasebrook

Abstract

Many important immunological phenomena can be characterized only in operational terms, and this leads often to circular reasoning. For example, antigens are identified and characterized in terms of the biological responses, antibody formation or cell-mediated reactions, that are induced by the antigens. However, antibodies and reactive cells can be identified only on the basis of their reactivity with the immunizing antigen. This rather unsatisfactory situation results in large part from the heterogeneity of cellular and molecular processes that are involved in immune responses as well as the very large number of different kinds of antibodies that can be produced. It is possible to identify and quantify reactions due to rare cells or molecules present at extremely low frequency among other, similar cells and molecules. However, it is difficult to obtain sufficient numbers of specifically reactive cells or antibody molecules to be able to characterize such cells or molecules biochemically or structurally in sufficient detail for independent definition of the basis for their immunological reactivity.

Keywords

Lymphoma Leukemia Influenza Sarcoma Polypeptide 

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank W. Fitch
    • 1
  • Andrew L. Glasebrook
    • 2
  1. 1.Committee on Immunology, Department of PathologyUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of ImmunologySwiss Institute for Experimental Cancer ResearchEpalinges S./LausanneSwitzerland

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