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Mutagens in Food

  • Raymond J. Shamberger

Abstract

In recent years there have been many attempts to determine whether carcinogens are present in our foods. A vast number of separate chemical entities are present in our foods: several thousand as additives and several times this number as natural constituents. In addition, some are present because of contamination or are formed during processing. Although most of these chemicals are present in relatively low concentrations, even very low levels of potent carcinogens could be a potential public health problem. It is therefore a problem to test the very large number of chemicals present in the complex mixture called food to see whether they may be contributing to our risk from cancer. To test whether a single chemical may be a carcinogen in the diet of rodents costs as much as $500,000. Clearly, simpler and less expensive tests should be devised as a screen to help decide which chemicals to test in long-term studies.

Keywords

Mutagenic Activity Pyrolysis Product Hamster Embryo Cell Chinese Hamster Lung Cell Soybean Globulin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Raymond J. Shamberger 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond J. Shamberger
    • 1
  1. 1.The Cleveland Clinic FoundationClevelandUSA

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