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Cross-Cultural Studies of Alcohol Use

  • Dwight B. Heath

Abstract

A major contribution of anthropology to alcohol studies is the description and analysis of the range of variation in drinking and its outcomes among diverse populations. Various kinds of cross-cultural comparisons are helpful for understanding the relationships among variables and for testing hypotheses about how alcohol use relates to other aspects of culture. Transcultural studies, small-scale comparisons of a few cultures, are reviewed. Also summarized are those hologeistic studies—in which associations between specific traits are statistically evaluated for a large worldwide sample of cultures—that have yielded theoretically significant models emphasizing anxiety, social structure, dependency, and power as basic motivations for drinking or drunkenness or both.

Keywords

Alcoholic Beverage Drinking Problem Drinking Pattern Alcohol Study Interdisciplinary Perspective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dwight B. Heath
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA

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