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Alcohol Use in the Perspective of Cultural Ecology

  • Andrew J. Gordon

Abstract

Examination of the use of alcohol in traditional agrarian society reveals that drinking and the drinking context is for the most part integrative, conflict-reducing, and reinforcing of corporate identity. With acculturation and modernization, and the introduction of full-scale cash-based economies, alcohol use is more frequently asocial and pathological and serves individual as opposed to jointly shared objectives. Analysis of these issues is accomplished through a review of the cultural ecological perspectives on drinking and culture in a variety of societies around the world.

Keywords

Alcoholic Beverage Drinking Behavior Drinking Pattern Traditional Society Beer Drinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew J. Gordon
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Smithers Alcoholism Treatment and Training CenterSt. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Socio-Medical Sciences, School of Public HealthColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of AnthropologyBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA

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