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Ultrastructural Features of Healing and Scarring of Experimental Atheroma

  • Giorgio Weber
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 168)

Abstract

Most of the available morphological data on regression of experimental atherosclerotic lesions of the arterial wall (rev. by Armstrong, 1976; Wissler, 1977; Weber, 1978; Stary, 1979) have been documented in animal models (pigs, dogs, monkeys) and are being investigated in man. It is chiefly from studies on monkeys that our knowledge has been substantiated. Wissler et al. (1975), Vesselinovitch et al. (1976) have demonstrated substantially reduced percentage of grossly involved aortic intima in monkeys withdrawn from atherogenic diets. The regressing lesions contain very little intracellular and extracellular lipid and show no evidence of a necrotic center (features that are usually prominent in advanced atherosclerotic lesions), contain a reduced number of cells (Stary, 1974; 1977) and are covered by an endothelial layer of regenerating cells (Weber et al., 1977) (Fig. 1–2).

Keywords

Rhesus Monkey Atherosclerotic Lesion Thoracic Aorta Foam Cell Ultrastructural Feature 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giorgio Weber
    • 1
  1. 1.Center of Research on Atherosclerosis - Institute of Pathological AnatomyUniversity of SienaItaly

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