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Hollow Fibers: Their Applications to the Study of Mammalian Cell Function

  • W. C. Hymer
  • M. Angeline
  • M. Chu
  • R. Grindlelan
  • J. Harkness
  • J. Hatfield
  • E. Hibbard
  • K. Kovacs
  • G. Mansur
  • A. Mastro
  • K. Motter
  • J. Parsons
  • C. Phelps
  • B. Ruskin
  • A. Signorella
  • W. Taylor
  • M. Thorner
  • G. Tindall
  • D. Wilbur
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND, volume 1)

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to summarize our experiences with hollow fibers; especially their applications with regard to the study of target cell responsiveness, the general theme of this book.

Keywords

Hollow Fiber Pituitary Cell Secretion Data Optic Tectum Dwarf Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. C. Hymer
    • 1
  • M. Angeline
    • 1
  • M. Chu
    • 2
  • R. Grindlelan
    • 3
  • J. Harkness
    • 1
  • J. Hatfield
    • 1
  • E. Hibbard
    • 1
  • K. Kovacs
    • 4
  • G. Mansur
    • 1
  • A. Mastro
    • 1
  • K. Motter
    • 1
  • J. Parsons
    • 5
  • C. Phelps
    • 1
  • B. Ruskin
    • 1
  • A. Signorella
    • 1
  • W. Taylor
    • 1
  • M. Thorner
    • 6
  • G. Tindall
    • 7
  • D. Wilbur
    • 8
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, Molecular and Cell BiologyThe Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA
  2. 2.Roswell Park Memorial InstituteBuffaloUSA
  3. 3.Ames Research CenterMoffett FieldUSA
  4. 4.Department of PathologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  5. 5.Department of AnatomyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  6. 6.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  7. 7.Department of NeurosurgeryEmory UniveristyAtlantaUSA
  8. 8.Department of AnatomyUniversity of South CarolinaCharlestownUSA

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