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Binding of Reversible and Irreversible Ligands to Rat Brain Opiate Receptors

  • M. Szücs
  • G. Tóth
  • S. Benyhe
  • J. Szécsi
  • M. Wollemann
  • K. Medzihradszky
Part of the Methodological Surveys in Biochemistry and Analysis book series (MSBA, volume 13)

Abstract

Various lines of pharmacological and biochemical evidence support the existence of multiple opiate receptors (for review see [1]; also #E-2 & #NC(E)-1, this vol.) Improved binding studies with radioactive ligands of high specific activity demonstrate non-linear Scatchard plots, consistent with subpopulations of high- and low-affinity sites. Elucidation of the properties of these biochemically defined receptor subpopulations and of their correlation with opiate actions would need the development of highly selective ligands. Several attempts have been made to synthesize compounds which co-valently bind to the opiate receptor [2, 3]. Among the enkephalins the chloromethyl ketone derivative would be a likely candidate (see [4]).

Keywords

Opiate Receptor Scatchard Analysis Chloromethyl Ketone Unlabelled Ligand Radioactive Ligand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Szücs
    • 1
  • G. Tóth
    • 2
  • S. Benyhe
    • 1
  • J. Szécsi
    • 3
  • M. Wollemann
    • 1
  • K. Medzihradszky
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of BiochemistrySzegedHungary
  2. 2.Isotope Laboratory of the Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of SciencesSzegedHungary
  3. 3.Central Research Institute for Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of SciencesBudapestHungary

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