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Thyroid Membrane Nad-Glycohydrolase and Adp•Ribosyl-Transferase, Possibly Relevant to TSH Action

  • M. De Wolf
  • A. Lagrou
  • H. J. Hilderson
  • G. Van Dessel
  • W. Dierick
Part of the Methodological Surveys in Biochemistry and Analysis book series (MSBA, volume 13)

Abstract

Cholera toxin stimulates the adenylate cyclase complex by mono-ADPribosylating the guanine regulatory component (N-protein) [1]. Although cholera toxin and thyrotropin (TSH) have structural and functional similarities [2], clear-cut discrepancies exist in their mode of action. Thus, neither TSH nor its α-subunit have any intrinsic ADPribosyltransferase or NAD-glycohydrolase (NADase) activity. However, in bovine thyroid membranes both activities are present [3], the ADPribosylation being stimulated by TSH, and with prolonged incubation the hormone itself is ADPribosylated [4]. These enzymic activities are probably related and so are here designated as enzyme system E1. Possibly other enzyme activities are implicated in E1.

Keywords

Sialic Acid Cholera Toxin Sulphanilic Acid Thyroid Adenoma Sialic Acid Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. De Wolf
    • 1
  • A. Lagrou
    • 1
  • H. J. Hilderson
    • 1
  • G. Van Dessel
    • 2
  • W. Dierick
    • 2
  1. 1.RUCA-Laboratory for Human BiochemistryUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  2. 2.UIA-Laboratory for Pathological BiochemistryUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium

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