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Isolation and Characterization of Spiny- (Clathrin)-Coated Membranes and Vesicles from Rodent Liver and Role in Receptor-Mediated Porcesses

  • Dorothy M. Morré
  • Keri Safranski
  • Kim E. Creek
  • Edward M. Croze
  • D. James Morré
Part of the Methodological Surveys in Biochemistry and Analysis book series (MSBA, volume 13)

Abstract

The availability of purified fractions of spiny- (clathrin-) coated membranes from rodent liver should facilitate biochemical investigations of receptor-mediated endocytosis and secretion. Clathrin is the major coat protein of both endocytotic and exocytotic vesicles and membranes in this and other tissues, and presumably plays some yet unknown role in membrane translocations.

Keywords

Coated Vesicle Vesicle Diameter Coated Membrane Rodent Liver Ethanesulphonic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothy M. Morré
    • 1
  • Keri Safranski
    • 1
  • Kim E. Creek
    • 2
  • Edward M. Croze
    • 1
  • D. James Morré
    • 1
  1. 1.Purdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.Department of Medical GeneticsSt. Louis Children’s HospitalSt. LouisUSA

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