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Poly (N-Acyl Ethyleneimines) with Polarizable Aromatic Side Chain Substituents and Their Complexes: Synthesis, Structure and Electronic Properties

  • M. H. Litt
  • J. Rodriguez
  • H. Nava
  • J. Kim
  • T. McClelland
  • W. Gordon
  • M. Dyan
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (POLS, volume 25)

Abstract

Our objectives in this work were to produce electrically interesting polymers with the following characteristics: 1. At some stage they should be formable, either through heat or solution; 2. The polymers should be regular and therefore crystallizable; 3. When crystallized, the π electrons of the electrically active portion of the molecule should overlap; 4. The active part should be a reasonably strong donor or acceptor, so it can be doped or complexed; and 5. The polymerization chemistry should be such that polymers can be made easily.

Keywords

Model Compound Aromatic Proton Lithium Chloride Absorption Tail Side Chain Polymer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. H. Litt
    • 1
  • J. Rodriguez
    • 1
  • H. Nava
    • 1
  • J. Kim
    • 1
  • T. McClelland
    • 2
  • W. Gordon
    • 2
  • M. Dyan
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Macromolecular ScienceCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Dept. of PhysicsCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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