Advertisement

The Synthesis of Aromatic Polyformals

  • F. J. Williams
  • A. S. Hay
  • H. M. Relles
  • J. C. Carnahan
  • G. R. Loucks
  • B. M. Boulette
  • P. E. Donahue
  • D. S. Johnson
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (POLS, volume 25)

Abstract

The synthesis of aliphatic polyformals (1) has been known for many years and is relatively straightforwardl. As shown in equation 1, aliphatic diols can be reacted directly with formaldehyde or dialkyl formals (2) to produce these polymers. The principal complication of the reaction occurs when the diol used contains 2, 3 or 4 carbon atoms in which case the formation of the cyclic formal (3) is favored.

Keywords

Methylene Chloride Phase Transfer Catalyst Formal Linkage High Molecular Weight Polymer Cyclic Dimer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    S.R. Sandler and W. Karo, “Polymer Synthesis”, Vol. II, Chapter 6, Academic Press, Inc., New York (1977).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J.W. Hill and W.H. Carothers, J. Amer. Chem. Soc, 57, 927 (1935)Google Scholar
  3. D.P. Pattison, J. Org. Chem., 22, 662 (1957).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 3.
    H.R. Musser and W.J. Jackson, U.S. Patent 3,875, 257 (1975)Google Scholar
  5. H.R. Musser and W.J. Jackson, U.S. Patent 3,809, 681 (1974).Google Scholar
  6. 4.
    See reference 1, Chapter 2, for a review of this subject.Google Scholar
  7. 5.
    R. Barclay, Jr., U.S. Patent, 3, 069, 386 (1962).Google Scholar
  8. 6.
    M. Matyner, A. Noshay and J.E. McGrath, Trans. Soc. Rheol., 2l2, 273 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 7.
    A. McKillop, J.C. Fiaud and R.P. Hug, Tetrahedron, 30, 1379 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 8.
    E.V. Dehmlow and J. Schmidt, Tetrahedron Lett. 2, 95 (1976).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 9.
    Aliquat 336 (95% active monomethyltricaprylyl ammonium chloride) obtained from General Mills Company.Google Scholar
  12. 10.
    A.S. Hay, F.J. Williams, et al, Polymer Preprints, 23, 117 (1982)Google Scholar
  13. A.S. Hay, F.J. Williams, et al, J. Polym. Sci, Polym. Lett. 21, 000 (1983).Google Scholar
  14. A.S. Hay, Sci, Polym. Lett. 21, 000 (1983).Google Scholar
  15. A.S. Hay, U.S. Patent 4,374, 974 (1983).Google Scholar
  16. A.S. Hay, U.S. Patent, 4,254, 254 (1981).Google Scholar
  17. G.R. Loucks and F.J. Williams. U.S. Patent 4,260, 733 (1981).Google Scholar
  18. F.J. Williams and P.E. Donahue, U.S. Patent 4,136, 087 (1979).Google Scholar
  19. D.S. Johnson, U.S. Patent 4,163, 833 (1979).Google Scholar
  20. J.C. Carnahan, U.S. Patent 4,216, 305 (1980).Google Scholar
  21. J.C. Carnahan, U.S. Patent, 4,310, 654 (1982).Google Scholar
  22. H.M. Relles and D.S. Johnson, U.S. Patent, 4,210, 731 (1980).Google Scholar
  23. 11.
    D.L. Head and C.G. McCarty, Tetrahedron Lett. 16, 1405 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 12.
    A. Maggiolo et al, U.S. Patent 3,139, 440 (1964).Google Scholar
  25. 13.
    A. Factor and C.M. Orlando, J. Polym. Sci, Polym. Chem. Edit, 18, 579 (1980).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. J. Williams
    • 1
  • A. S. Hay
    • 1
  • H. M. Relles
    • 1
  • J. C. Carnahan
    • 1
  • G. R. Loucks
    • 1
  • B. M. Boulette
    • 1
  • P. E. Donahue
    • 1
  • D. S. Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.Corporate Research & DevelopmentGeneral Electric Co.SchenectadyUSA

Personalised recommendations