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Studies on Changes in Tissue Water Constitution and Focal Brain Tissue Pressure in Experimental Cerebral Infarction

  • H. Kuchiwaki
  • M. Faruse
  • T. Gonda
  • N. Hirai
  • S. Inao
  • A. Ikeyama
  • N. Kageyama

Abstract

Knowledge of focal tissue pressure in infarcted brain areas is important with regard to the formation and spread of ischemic brain edema. Migration of edema fluid evolving from infarcted brain areas depends on the distribution of focal tissue pressure. To improve our understanding of pressure dynamics in ischemic cerebral edema, intracranial pressure (ICP) should be studied in focal cerebral ischemia within the closed skull. Although many experimental investigations have been conducted on the dynamics of ICP in cerebral ischemia, changes of local tissue pressure in ischemic brain with the skull remaining closed have not yet been subjected to an adequate analysis.

Keywords

Total Water Content Edema Fluid Tissue Pressure Bind Water Ratio Bind Water Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Kuchiwaki
    • 1
  • M. Faruse
    • 1
  • T. Gonda
    • 1
  • N. Hirai
    • 1
  • S. Inao
    • 1
  • A. Ikeyama
    • 1
  • N. Kageyama
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryNagoya University, School of MedicineShowa-KuJapan

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