Advertisement

Peritumoral Brain Edema: Effects of Methylprednisolone on Local Cerebral Blood Flow, Glucose Utilization and Capillary Permeability

  • K. Yamada
  • T. Hayakawa
  • Y. Ushio
  • A. Kato
  • N. Yamada
  • H. Mogami

Abstract

Management of brain edema associated with tumor is extremely important for the treatment of brain tumor patients. Mass effects of the peritumoral edema often exceed those of the tumor itself. However, the mechanism of edema formation and the pathophysiology of this type of edema remain uncertain. Our previous study11 revealed that water and electrolyte content in the peritumoral brain tissue were similar to that of plasma, thus indicating that peritumoral brain edema is of the vasogenic type.

Keywords

Brain Edema Capillary Permeability Edema Fluid Local Cerebral Blood Flow Local Cerebral Glucose Utilization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Blasberg RG, Lajtha A: A substrate specificity of steady state amino acid uptake in mouse brain slices. Arch Biochem Biophys 112: 361–377 (1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Blasberg RG, Groothuis D, Molnar P: Application of quantitative autoradiographic measurements in experimental brain tumor models, Sem in Neurol 1: 203–221 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Ehrenkranz JRL, Posner JB: Adrenocorticosteroid hormones. In: Brain Metastasis Weiss L, Gilbert HA, Posner JB (Eds) GK Hall & Co. Boston 115–133 (1980).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kety SS: Measurement of local flow by the exchange of an inert diffusible substance. Methods Med Res 8: 228–236 (1960).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ohno K, Pettigrew K, Rapoport S: Lower limits of cerebrovascular permeability to nonelectrolytes in the conscious rat. Am J Physiol 235: H299–H307 (1978).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Pappius HM, Savaki HE, Fieschi C, Rapoport SI, Sokoloff L: Osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier and local cerebral glucose utilization. Ann Neurol 5: 211–219 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Pappius HM: Local cerebral glucose utilization in thermally traumatized rat brain. Ann Neurol 9: 484–491 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Reulen HJ, Hadjidimos A, Schürmann K: The effect of dexamethasone on water and electrolyte content and on rCBF in perifocal brain edema in man. In Steroids and Brain Edema Reulen HJ, Schürmann K, Springer Berlin, 239–252 (1972).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Sakurada O, Kennedy C, Jehle J, Brown JD, Carbin GL: Measurement of local cerebral blood flow with iodo(14C)antipyrine. Am J Physiol 3: H59–H66 (1978).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Sokoloff L, Reivich M, Kennedy C, Des Rosiers MH, Patlak CS, Pettigrew KD, Sakurada O, Shinohara M: The 14C-deoxyglucose method for the measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization. Theory, procedure and normal values in the conscious and aneshtetized albino rat. J Neurochem 28: 897–916 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Yamada K, Bremer AM, West CR: Effects of dexamethasone on tumor-induced brain edema and its distribution in the brain of monkeys. J Neurosurg 50: 361–367 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Yamada
    • 1
  • T. Hayakawa
    • 1
  • Y. Ushio
    • 1
  • A. Kato
    • 1
  • N. Yamada
    • 1
  • H. Mogami
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryOsaka University Medical SchoolFukushimaJapan

Personalised recommendations