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Proton NMR Study on Brain Edema

  • Kimiyoshi Hirakawa
  • Shoji Naruse
  • Yoshiharu Horikawa
  • Chuzo Tanaka
  • Hiroyasu Nishikawa

Abstract

In the study of brain edema, the most essential problem is the condition and motion of water accumulated abnormally in the brain tissue. Little was known, however, about the water molecules in the edematous tissue until the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique was applied for the first time in 1975 to the investigation of brain edema2,5. By this nondestructive method, it was possible to clarify the behavior of water molecules in biological tissue.

Keywords

White Matter Brain Edema Slow Component Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study Mongolian Gerbil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kimiyoshi Hirakawa
    • 1
  • Shoji Naruse
    • 1
  • Yoshiharu Horikawa
    • 1
  • Chuzo Tanaka
    • 1
  • Hiroyasu Nishikawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Neurosurgery and Physiology Kyoto PrefecturalUniversity of MedicineKyotoJapan

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