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Glutamate and Free Fatty Acid Concentrations in Extracellular Vasogenic Edema Fluid

  • K. Maier Hauff
  • M. Lange
  • L. Schürer
  • Ch. Guggenbichler
  • W. Vogt
  • K. Jacob
  • A. Baethmann

Abstract

Traumatic or ischemic injury to the brain causes focal tissue necrosis together with an opening of the blood-brain barrier leading to an influx of vasogenic edema into the cerebral parenchyma. Clinical and experimental observations suggest an involvement of chemical factors, or compounds mediating secondary brain damage, such as vasogenic brain edema. Mediators may enhance the primary damage inflicted to the blood brain barrier, induce derangements of the cerebral microcirculation, and cause formation of secondary cytotoxic necrosis, or cell swelling in focal and perifocal areas. Many systems and compounds have been studied in this context2. A great number of reports, including those of ourselves demonstrate glutamate and free fatty acids to exhibit powerful neurotoxic properties. These findings together with the occurrence of glutamate and free fatty acids either in the intra-cellular compartment, or the lipid moiety in vast amounts in normal brain render both substances excellent candidates as mediators of secondary brain damage. Exposure of brain tissue to glutamate by iontophoretic administration to cerebral cortex, or by ventriculo-cisternal perfusion in-vivo was found to induce swelling and destruction of cellular elements, or gross brain edema, respective-ly14,l,9,13.

Keywords

Free Fatty Acid Arachidonic Acid Brain Edema Vasogenic Edema Glutamate Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Maier Hauff
    • 1
  • M. Lange
    • 1
  • L. Schürer
    • 1
  • Ch. Guggenbichler
    • 1
  • W. Vogt
    • 1
  • K. Jacob
    • 1
  • A. Baethmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Surgical Research, Departments of Neurosurgery Clinical ChemistryUniversity of Munich Klinikum GrosshadernGermany

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