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Intestinal Phosphate Transport

  • Meinrad Peterlik

Abstract

Functions of inorganic phosphate (Pi) differ widely in the vertebrate organism. This can be illustrated, e.g., by the role of phosphate in soft tissue on the one hand, where it serves mainly as an inorganic precursor of a large variety of essential organic phosphocompounds (phospholipids, nucleotides, metabolic intermediates, phosphoproteins, etc.), and by its occurrence in the skeletal system on the other hand, where it exists in crystalline form as hydroxyapatite together with calcium. Pi in mineralized bone, makes up as much as 85% of total body phosphate. The remaining 15% is accounted for by soft-tissue Pi and is about equally distributed between muscle and other nonosseous tissue (Bringhurst and Potts, 1979).

Keywords

Phosphate Transport Intestinal Phosphate Absorption Embryonic Chick Intestine 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meinrad Peterlik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of General and Experimental PathologyUniversity of Vienna Medical SchoolViennaAustria

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