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Structure-Activity Relations in Carcinogenesis by N-Nitroso Compounds

  • William Lijinsky
Part of the Topics in Chemical Mutagenesis book series (TCM, volume 1)

Abstract

Since 1956 when the carcinogenic activity of the first N-nitroso compound, nitrosodimethylamine, was reported by Magee and Barnes,(1) there has been growing interest in the biological activity of this group of compounds. Extensive studies of the carcinogenic activity of N-nitroso compounds of various structures have been carried out with the aim of using the differences in activity to suggest possible mechanisms of their carcinogenic action. This approach, which is common in pharmacology, has proved very useful.

Keywords

Liver Tumor Syrian Hamster Esophageal Tumor Carcinogenic Activity Glandular Stomach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • William Lijinsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Carcinogenesis ProgramNCI-Frederick Cancer Research FacilityFrederickUSA

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