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Coal Characterization

  • Heinz H. Damberger
  • Richard D. Harvey
  • Rodney R. Ruch
  • Josephus ThomasJr.

Abstract

Coal is the end product of a sequence of biological and geological processes, the complexity of which should at least be appreciated whenever a coal is appraised for a specific use. Care should, therefore, be taken to obtain information on the geological setting of the coal; too often lack of such information reduces the value of samples and any analyses performed on them.

Keywords

Coal Seam Mineral Matter Bituminous Coal Spontaneous Combustion Coal Rank 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heinz H. Damberger
    • 1
  • Richard D. Harvey
    • 1
  • Rodney R. Ruch
    • 1
  • Josephus ThomasJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Illinois State Geological SurveyChampaignUSA

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