Costs of Nuclear Power—The Achilles’ Heel

  • Bernard L. Cohen


An important strategy of antinuclear activists has been to stop nuclear power by driving the cost up to the point where it becomes uneconomical. It is difficult not to admire the proficiency with which they have succeeded in attaining their goal. The last order for a nuclear power plant in the United States was placed in 1978, and several dozen partially completed plants have been abandoned since that time, at a cost to the American public of many billions of dollars. But the real coup de grace by the antinuclear activists has been in placing the blame for this fiasco on the shoulders of the nuclear power industry, using this argument to cement their victory.


Nuclear Power Plant Inflation Rate Consumer Price Index Construction Time Nuclear Plant 


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Reference Notes

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Copyright information

© Bernard L. Cohen 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernard L. Cohen

There are no affiliations available

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