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Natural Resistance to Animal Parasites

  • Joseph F. Albright
  • Julia W. Albright
Part of the Contemporary Topics in Immunobiology book series (CTI, volume 12)

Abstract

There exists great variation in the degree to which parasites are fastidious with respect to their hosts. This is exemplified by the expression “host range,” a descriptive feature of a given parasite used to characterize the variety of species that can be infected by that parasite. Many parasites are highly selective (i.e., specific), their range of hosts being limited to one, or a few related, species. These are believed to be well-adapted parasites having settled on a host that is optimum for their welfare. Other parasites have a broad host range and will survive, if not thrive, in a variety of hosts.

Keywords

Natural Killer Cell Nude Mouse Trypanosoma Cruzi Schistosoma Mansoni Natural Resistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph F. Albright
    • 1
  • Julia W. Albright
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Life SciencesIndiana State UniversityTerre HauteUSA

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