Sex Roles in Medicine

  • Linda S. Fidell

Abstract

The extent to which the seeking and receiving of medical care are influenced by social factors is probably underestimated by the general public. Although current medical practice has many of the trappings of science, it, like the law and education, is still practiced in a social milieu in which cultural beliefs abound.

Keywords

Psychotropic Drug Nonverbal Behavior Sexual Prejudice National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Medical Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda S. Fidell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCalifornia State UniversityNorthridgeUSA

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