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Sex Roles, Psychological Assessment, and Patient Management

  • Peter B. Zeldow

Abstract

The last 20 years have seen increased recognition (at least among social scientists, feminists, and feminist sympathizers) that sex roles can be restrictive and that gender considerations have exceeded their proper boundaries in many aspects of American life. These insights have been accompanied by increased scrutiny of the mental health professions for evidence of discrimination, exploitation, and oppression in the treatment of women. Two early landmarks in this effort are Chester’s (1972) book, Women and Madness, and the study of Broverman, Broverman, Clarkson, Rosenkrantz, and Vogel (1970) that claimed to provide the first empirical demonstration of a double standard of mental health among mental health professionals. The ensuing decade has witnessed a fair amount of empirical research aimed at determining both the nature of sex discrimination and sex role stereotyping and the extent to which they pervade the clinical practices of psychiatrists, psychologists, and other mental health professionals. The present chapter attempts to review the literature on gender differences in select aspects of psychiatric and psychological assessment (judgments of optimal mental health, severity of psychopathology, need for treatment, prognosis) and patient management (referrals, duration of treatment, prescription of medications). The effects of gender and sex roles on various diagnostic entities and on psychotherapy process and outcome are discussed elsewhere in this volume.

Keywords

Mental Health Professional Clinical Judgment Psychological Assessment Double Standard Stimulus Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter B. Zeldow
    • 1
  1. 1.Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical CenterChicagoUSA

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