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Sex-Role Stereotypes and the Epidemiology of Child Psychopathology

  • Robert F. Eme

Abstract

Although the sex differences in adult psychopathology have been the subject of several examinations, there have been only a few systematic explorations of sex differences in child psychopathology. The most widely cited has been that of the sociologist Walter Gove (1979; Gove and Herb, 1974). Unfortunately, his work is limited since he superficially addresses the topic of the origin and development of sex differences, as is evident from his omission of any reference to the Maccoby and Jacklin (1974) landmark tome, and to many other writings on the origins and development of sex differences. These deficiencies have been corrected in more recent expositions (Erne, 1979; Al-Issa, 1982) and will, one hopes, be more fully rectified in the present examination.

Keywords

Child Psychiatry Pervasive Developmental Disorder Child Psychopathology Adjustment Disorder Infantile Autism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Eme
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinical psychologist, Des Plaines, and private practiceForest Hospital and FoundationEvanstonUSA

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