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Substance Rates of Different Steps of Purine Metabolism in Normal and Preserved Red Blood Cells (RBC) Studied in Experiments Simulating In Vivo Conditions

  • Carl-Henric de Verdier
  • Frank Niklasson
  • Claes F. Högman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 165)

Abstract

In RBC the energy provided by glycolysis is transferred by ATP to energy requiring processes as ion pumping, chemical synthesis etc by means of ATP. That explains the use of this substance as a marker for cell viability after preservation of erythrocytes and also the addition of precursors — adenine, adenosine, inosine (for the ribose phosphate part) etc — to preservation media. The physiological role of RBC in the transport of purine compounds between the organs of the body has been discussed for years. In order to answer questions hidden within these fields of exploration more firm data describing the substance rates of the specific steps of purine metabolism in RBC are needed.

Keywords

Purine Nucleoside Purine Metabolism Substance Rate Adenylate Energy Charge Preservation Medium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    C.-H. de Verdier, A. Ericson, F. Niklasson and T. Groth, Erythrocyte metabolism of purines and purine nucleosides during storage and simulated physiological conditions, in “Red Cell Metabolism and Function,” G. J Brewer, ed., New York (1981).Google Scholar
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    O. Akerblom, A. Ericson, C. F. Högman, D. Strauss and C.-H. de Verdier, Purine metabolism of erythrocytes preserved in adenine, adenine-inosine and adenine-guanosine supplemented media. Transfusion, 21: 397 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Å. Ericson, F. Niklasson and C.-H. de Verdier, Systematic study of nucleotide analysis of human erythrocytes using anionic exchanges and HPLC. Clin Chim Acta. Submitted for publication.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl-Henric de Verdier
    • 1
  • Frank Niklasson
    • 1
  • Claes F. Högman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Chemistry and Blood CenterUniversity HospitalUppsalaSweden

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